Skin-Sensitive

Many of you have asked “What is skin-sensitive?” In fact, it is the most asked question of the week. We’re excited that you want to learn more about this condition. With the limited amount of information on this particular condition, we thought it best to speak with someone who is skin-sensitive. So, we enlisted the help of TL Robinson, Founder and & Owner of MASS EDEN. She is sensitive and created the brand to provide skin-sensitive consumers with a body care option.

 

What is skin-sensitive?

Similar to sensitive skin [there is no dermatological definition], skin-sensitivity is a condition where the body negatively responds to stimuli and effects people of all ages. The response can affect a specific area on the body or the entire body. This condition goes beyond symptoms of common allergies and sensitive skin due to breadth, depth and severity of negative skin reactions. For me, skin-sensitive is on the severe end of the sensitive skin spectrum. Often times, the condition can be misdiagnosed as skin condition such as acne or a simple dermatitis.

 

What does skin-sensitive look like?

Signs or symptoms of skin-sensitivity include but are not limited to: dermatitis, intense and excessive itching, rashes, hives, inflammation and redness, peeling, lesions. For some of us, some skin-sensitive symptoms may not be visible because we have a sensitivity to touch. To others, we appear fine.

 

What causes of this condition?

There are several sources to the condition: existing skin condition, excessive exposure to an irritant or allergies.

 

What the triggers that cause a negative skin reaction?

There are a wide range of triggers for skin-sensitivity. Some triggers can be related while others can have absolutely nothing in common. And a skin sensitive person may have many triggers to deal with on a daily basis. Triggers can be but are not limited to:

  • The environment: pollution, dust, car exhaust, cold weather, hot weather
  • Sun
  • Hard water
  • (Artificial) Ingredients
  • Hormones
  • Jewelry
  • Household cleaning products
  • Jewelry
  • Textiles / materials for bedding, clothing and accessories
  • Diet
  • Dirt
  • Stress
  • Body care products: soap, moisturizer, shampoo, conditioner, make up, styling products, sun block, perfume/cologne, toothpaste, etc.
  • Food

 

How do you treat skin-sensitivity?

More often than not, this condition is diagnosed as acne, dermatitis or a basic allergy and treatment includes prescribed or over-the-counter medication; use of topical ointments or creams; or, use products labeled for “sensitive skin”. These treatments may work for some but not for everyone. In some instances, there is no treatment because there are no visible symptoms or no known means of relief. [Industries are becoming more aware of skin-sensitivity or severe allergies and more options are becoming available no the market.] For skin-sensitive people like me, products with the “for sensitive skin” label may not always be effective and may be triggers. For me, avoidance of my triggers has been the best treatment.

 

How can someone manage skin-sensitivity?

To successfully live with the condition and minimize negative reactions, it’s important to understand that sensitivity can be triggered by any source. So, learning your triggers is the first and most important step in managing this condition. Once you learn the triggers, avoid them like the plague! Seriously! Avoiding triggers (where possible) gives your skin and body the time it needs to heal (where an illness/disease is not present). Next, it’s important understand the triggers may change over time. A trigger today may not be a trigger five years from now and vice versa. Lastly, using products that are gentle on skin and help to strengthen the epidermis may help to minimize the effects of a negative skin reaction.

Resources:
healthguides.healthgrades.comChoosing the Right Clothes for Sensitive Skin; healthguides.healthgrades.com/soothing-your-sensitive-skin/choosing-the-right-clothes-for-sensitive-skin
Robinson, TL. Personal interview. October 2017
fda.gov; “Hypoallergenic” Cosmetics; https://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/labeling/claims/ucm2005203.htm
medicalnewstoday.com; Everything you need to know about allergies; medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264419.php  [Note: This post does not discuss allergies to body care products]

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Categories: Wellness

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